Facebook

Follow Me: Facebook Launches Subscribe Feature to Fight Off Google+ and Twitter

Facebook today announced a major new feature that could put renewed pressure on Google+ and Twitter to out-innovate the social networking market leader. Facebook users can now choose to allow others to asymmetrically follow them thanks to the new (and optional) “subscribe button”– just like on Twitter and Google+. This is an opt-in feature, so you may not see it on every Facebook profile. The fact that Facebook even decided to go into this direction, however, shows that it may be changing its views on how “relationships” on the service should work and that it took a closer look at the success that Twitter and Google+ are having with this model.

Facebook

Anonymous’ Next Target: Facebook

Anonymous, the loose-knit organization of hackers and activists that grew out of the 4chan messageboard, has claimed responsibility for a number of high-profile hacks, defacements and denial of service attacks in the past. Among the groups’ targets were sites from major organizations like New Corp., Iranian government websites and the sites of the IMF. Now,…

Facebook

Vibes: Facebook’s Upcoming Music Feature?

It’s long been rumored that Facebook is working on adding some kind of music product to its feature set. What exactly that will look like remains to be seen, but Jeff Rose, an enterprising developer just discovered some code in the application Facebook uses to distribute its new video chat plugin that the company just launched yesterday. In this code, he found a reference to “Facebook Vibes.” While it’s not clear what Vibes will do, the fact that it will be a downloadable piece of software points toward an experience that will be similar to Google Music or iTunes in the Cloud (assuming, of course, that “Vibes” is really a music product).

Facebook

German Traffic Cops Use Facebook Profile Photos to Identify Speeders

There has been a lot of discussion around Facebook’s face recognition-based photo tagging feature lately, but putting your picture up on Facebook can have other unintended consequences as well. In two German states (Hamburg and North Rhine-Westphalia), police agents now regularly use Facebook to ensure that they’re sending traffic tickets that were generated by automated…