Browsers

Opera: It’s Time to Rethink How We Publish Texts Online

The way we publish and read text in our browsers today is not that different from the way Egyptians used scrolls over 3,000 years ago. In the real world, though, the scroll gave way to the codex a long time ago, but on the web, we’re still mostly wedded to the idea of scrolling through text. Opera, the developers of the popular desktop and mobile browser of the same name, just released Opera Reader, a prototype of a concept they call “native pages,” which is meant to bring the ideas of a more book-like publishing layout back to the web. The result, which developers can achieve with just a few lines of codes, looks more like the New York Times Skimmer interface than a regular website.

Opinion

The Internet Explorer IQ Hoax and the State of Tech Blogging

Last Friday, the tech blogosphere was enamored by a study that claimed that Internet Explorer users had a lower IQ than users of other browsers. The study by AptiQuant found that the average IE6 user only scored just over 80 on its IQ test – a test score that is, in terms of real-life accomplishments, generally associated with elementary school dropouts and unskilled workers. The study was a hoax.

Apple

Opera Mini for iOS: Brilliant on the iPhone, Frustrating on the iPad

Opera today released the latest version of it’s Opera Mini mobile browser for iOS. This is Opera’s debut on the iPad. On the iPhone, this new version marks a huge step up from Opera 5, which was virtually unusable due to they way it displayed the rendered text. This new version has none of these issues and feels incredibly fast and smooth. On the iPad, however, it’s generally unusable, though this is not necessarily Opera’s fault: most websites automatically switch to a stripped-down mobile view when they see a request from Opera Mini, no matter the size of the screen the site is rendered on. This means lots of screen estate simply goes wasted.

Browsers

Next: Opera Browser Gets a Dev Channel, Too

Blame Chrome. Ever since Google started releasing self-updating developer versions of its browser, other have been following suit. Mozilla now users the same concept for releasing early (and potentially unstable) versions of Firefox and starting today, Opera will use the same concept to give early adopters a sneak peak at upcoming version (codename Swordfish) of its browser, too. Dubbed Opera Next, users can install this version parallel to the stable version of Opera (these will remain two completely separate installs).

Browsers

5 Reasons Why You Should Give Opera 11 a Try

Opera just released the 11th version of its desktop browser for Mac, Windows, FreeBSD and Linux. For a while, Opera was just an also-ran as Firefox and Chrome battled for the speed crown and market share in the browser business. Over the last year or so, however, Opera staged quite a comeback in the desktop arena and version 11 is the current culmination of this work.

Here are the top 5 new features that make Opera 11 worth another look.