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Has Lulzsec Leaked Your Data Online? Here’s a Simple Tool to Check

The last few months saw the public rise of a new hacker group that works under the name Lulzsec. So far, they have hacked into networks from organizations that range from Sony BMG to Nintendo, Pron.com and PBS. In doing so, they have retrieved thousands of names, passwords and other personal data from unsuspecting users. While most of these organizations then go on and sell this information on the black market, Lulzsec regularly releases all of the data it collects online (they are, after all, just doing it for the ‘lulz’). Now, a new tools helps you to find out if any of your own personal data was made public in one of these leaks.

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CloudFlare Wants to Make Your Site Faster and Safer

Eight months ago, CloudFlare launched its free content delivery network service, which I’ve been using on all of my sites since the day it became available. Today, at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference, the company announced its newest product: CloudFlare Apps. This new service allows CloudFlare users to install popular web apps like Apture, Typekit, Pingdom…

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New Twitter Worm Promises to Tell You Who Unfollowed You

A new Twitter worm is spreading quickly this morning by pretending to tell users who has unfollowed them. Through using this kind of smart social engineering (who wouldn’t want to know who these ungrateful people are?), this rogue Twitter app gains access to a user’s account by using Twitter’s standard authentication mechanism. The worm also attaches terms to every one of these tweets that are currently trending on Twitter, ensuring these messages get seen by an even wider audience.

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Paper: Android's Graphical Passcodes are Insecure

Most Android phones allow users to protect their phones from unauthorized access by drawing a pattern on their device’s touchscreens. According to a team of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, however, these graphical passwords are actually extremely easy to crack, as “oily residues, or smudges, on the touch screen surface, are one side effect of touches from which frequently used patterns such as a graphical password might be inferred.”